United Arab Emirates Travel Guide - UAE Tourist Attractions, UAE Transportation, UAE Hotels and Accommodations

United Arab Emirates Travel Guide

UAE Hotels
Abu Dhabi Hotels
Ajman Hotels
Al Ain Hotels
Deira Hotels
Fujairah Hotels
Jumeirah Hotels
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Ras Al Khaimah Hotels

United Arab Emirates Travel Destinations
Abu Dhabi, UAE
Ajman, UAE
Al Ain, UAE
Deira, UAE
Fujairah, UAE
Jumeirah, UAE
Sharjah, UAE
Sheikh Zayef Road, UAE
Ras Al Khaimah, UAE

UAE Directory & UAE Travel Information
UAE History
UAE Geography
UAE Emirates
UAE Politics
UAE Foreign Relations
UAE Demographics
UAE Religions
UAE Business and Economics
UAE Education
Human Rights in the UAE
UAE Transportation
UAE Technology
UAE Media and Telecommunications
UAE Sports
Abu Dhabi Travel Information
Ajman Travel Information

Al Ain Travel Information
Deira Dubai Travel Information
Fujairah Travel Information
Jumeirah Travel Information
Sharjah Travel Information
Sheikh Zayef Road Travel Information
Ras Al Khaimah Travel Information


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UAE Travel Guide
UAE History

UAE Travel Guide offers travel tips and information for top travel places and best destinations. We feature links, resources and large selection of budget airlines, chartered planes, sea cruises, ferries, travel agencies, land transports and attractions including beaches, medical tourism, retirement homes, historical and pilgrimage tours.


The United Arab Emirates was originally formed from tribally-organized Arabian Peninsula sheikhdoms along the southern coast of the Persian Gulf and the northwestern coast of the Gulf of Oman. It had been part of Oman and was then called Oman's Gulf. The UAE was established in 1971 when the emirates bonded together and became one united country. It has since evolved into a modern, high-income nation.

Portuguese

Portuguese expansion into the Indian Ocean in the early sixteenth century following Vasco da Gama's route of exploration saw them battle the Ottomans up the coast of the Persian Gulf. The Portuguese controlled the area for 150 years in which they conquered the inhabitants of the Arabian peninsula. It is noteworthy to mention that Vasco da Gama was helped by Ibn Majid, an Arab from Julphar (now known as Ras Al Khaimah, one of the UAE emirates), to find the route of spices.

British and Ottomans

Then, portions of the nation came under the direct influence of the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. Thereafter the region was known to the British as the "Pirate Coast", as raiders based there harassed the shipping industry despite both European and Arab navies patrolling the area from the 17th century into the 19th century. British expeditions to protect the Indian trade from raiders at Ras al-Khaimah led to campaigns against that headquarters and other harbours along the coast in 1819. The next year, a peace treaty was signed to which all the sheikhs of the coast adhered. Raids continued intermittently until 1835, when the sheikhs agreed not to engage in hostilities at sea. In 1853, they signed a treaty with the United Kingdom, under which the sheikhs (the "Trucial Sheikhdoms") agreed to a "perpetual maritime truce." It was enforced by the United Kingdom, and disputes among sheikhs were referred to the British for settlement.

Primarily in reaction to the ambitions of other European countries, the United Kingdom and the Trucial Sheikhdoms established closer bonds in an 1892 treaty, similar to treaties entered into by the UK with other Persian Gulf principalities. The sheikhs agreed not to dispose of any territory except to the United Kingdom and not to enter into relationships with any foreign government other than the United Kingdom without its consent. In return, the British promised to protect the Trucial Coast from all aggression by sea and to help in case of land attack.

In 1955, the United Kingdom sided with Abu Dhabi in the latter's dispute with Oman over the Buraimi Oasis another territory to the south. A 1974 agreement between Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia would have settled the Abu Dhabi-Saudi border dispute; however, the agreement has yet to be ratified by the UAE government and is not recognised by the Saudi government. The border with Oman also remains officially unsettled, but the two governments agreed to delineate the border in May 1999.

Sheikh Zayed, Oil and The Union

In the early 1960s, oil was discovered in Abu Dhabi, an event that led to quick unification calls made by UAE sheikdoms. His Highness Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan became ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1966 and the British started losing their oil investments and contracts to U.S. oil companies.

The British had earlier started a development office that helped in some small developments in the Emirates. The sheikhs of the Emirates then decided to form a council to coordinate matters between them and took over the development office. They formed the Trucial States Council,[6] and appointed Adi Bitar, Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum's legal advisor, as Secretary General and Legal Advisor to the Council. The Council was terminated once the United Arab Emirates was formed.

In 1968, the United Kingdom announced its decision, reaffirmed in March 1971, to end the treaty relationships with the seven Trucial Sheikhdoms which had been, together with Bahrain and Qatar, under British protection. The nine attempted to form a union of Arab Emirates, but by mid-1971 they were still unable to agree on terms of union, even though the British treaty relationship was to expire in December of that year.

Bahrain became independent in August, and Qatar in September 1971. When the British-Trucial Shaikhdoms treaty expired on December 1, 1971, they became fully independent.

The rulers of Abu Dhabi and Dubai decided to form a union between their two emirates independently, prepare a constitution, then call the rulers of the other five emirates to a meeting and offer them the opportunity to join. It was also agreed between the two that Adi Bitar write the constitution by December 2, 1971.

On that date, at the Dubai Guesthouse Palace, four other emirates agreed to enter into a union called the United Arab Emirates. Ras al-Khaimah joined later, in early 1972.

The UAE sent forces into Kuwait during the 1990–91 Persian Gulf War and the US also. The UAE supports military operations from the United States and other Coalition nations that are engaged in the liberation of Afghanistan (2001) and Iraq (2003) as well as operations supporting the Global War on Terrorism for the Horn of Africa at the Al Dhafra Air Base located outside of Abu Dhabi. The air base also supported Allied operations during the 1991 Persian Gulf War and Operation Northern Watch.

On November 2, 2004, the UAE's first president, His Highness Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, died. His eldest son, Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, succeeded as ruler of Abu Dhabi. In accordance with the constitution, the UAE's Supreme Council of Rulers elected Khalifa as president. Sheikh Mohammad bin Zayed Al Nahyan succeeded Khalifa as Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi.


United Arab Emirates Travel Guide also showcase a unique blend of travel and leisure photos and stories, updates, events and announcements about roads, shopping malls, hotels, bed and breakfast, restaurants, groceries and more. Not just a travel guide but one-of-a-kind discovery of people and places.

 


United Arab Emirates Travel Informations and United Arab Emirates Travel Guide
UAE History - Geography of the UAE - Emirates of the UAE - Politics of the UAE - Foreign Relations of the UAE
Demographics of the UAE - Religion in the UAE - Economy of the UAE - UAE Education - Human Rights in the UAE
Transportation in the UAE - Technology, Media and Telecommunications - Sports in the UAE

Abu Dhabi Dubai Travel Information - Ajman Dubai Travel Information - Al Ain Dubai Travel Information
Deira Dubai Travel Information - Fujairah Dubai Travel Information - Jumeirah Dubai Travel Information
Sharjah Dubai Travel Information - Sheikh Zayef Road Dubai Travel Information - Ras Al Khaimah Dubai Travel Information

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